Kraspedon Dino Aka Aladino Felix

Dino Kraspedon was the pen name of Brazilian Aladino Felix, convicted political terrorist, who in 1959 published My Contact with Flying Saucers, a book that told a story very much in the vein of classic USA contactee George Adamski. Felix, or Kraspedon, claimed that in 1952 (the same year as Adamski's alleged contact with Orthon, a completely human "Space Brother" from Venus), he had seen a saucer land in the woods near Paraná, Brazil, and spoken with the completely human space-alien pilot, who later came to Felix's home and had a long, pleasant chat- the substance of which, as related by Felix, was similar to the Theosophical wisdom from Adamski's Space Brothers.

The visitor was a nameless alien from the moons of Jupiter, but also a good Christian, who easily converted the self-proclaimed atheist Felix to belief in the God of the Old and New Testaments. Unlike God, the visitor helpfully explained, "Gravity does not exist," relativity is "all wrong," and so is quantum physics. The visitor's various opinions about physics coincided very closely with those previously championed by Felix himself. The visitor also provided Felix with several prophecies, including that "another sun will soon enter our solar system." Much of My Contact with Flying Saucers is available on-line.

In 1965, the year of Adamski's death, Felix entered the limelight as a cult leader and prophet. One of Felix's few prophecies that came to pass involved predictions of a wave of bombings, murders and robberies throughout Brazil, throughout the year 1968. When members of the group which claimed responsibility were arrested they reported that Aladino Felix was their leader. Upon being placed in police custody, Felix claimed to be "an ambassador to the earth from Venus." he is also reported to have said that "My friends from space will come here and free me and avenge my arrest. You can look for tragic consequences to humanity when the flying saucers invade this planet."[citation needed] In 1971 Felix was convicted and judged to be dangerously mentally ill; he was confined to an asylum.

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